A Woman's Perspective On The Times We Live In


June 27, 2012

Product Recommendation: SunDanzer Solar Refrigerator

     Ever since I read the book, One Second After, by William Forstchen, I have been haunted by one particular scenario.  Without spoiling the book, it's a tale of what society will be like after an EMP, and the different situations we will face.
     If this country is ever targeted with an EMP (Elecromagnetic Pulse), the results could be catastrophic.  Because an EMP is an oversized outburst of atmospheric electricity, the resultant intense magnetic fields can induce ground currents strong enough to burn out power lines and electrical equipment across the country.  At risk are the more than 200,000 miles of high-voltage transmission lines that cross North America, supplying 1,800 utilities that power TVs, lights, refrigerators and air conditioners.  Let's not forget that support systems like hospitals and police stations will also be affected.
     But among the most seriously affected will be those people who rely on life-saving medications; Diabetics being impacted the most.  Insulin cannot be exposed to direct heat or light.  And unopened, not-in-use insulin should be stored in a refrigerator at a temperature of 36-46˚ F; opened, in-use insulin stored at room temperature below 86˚ F.  Without refrigeration, the insulin will be ineffective!
     So, even if you don't buy into the possibility of an EMP, you can easily see that any kind of pro-longed catastrophe is a life-and-death-situation for a Diabetic.


     But here is a product that could solve that problem!  It's called the SunDanzer Solar Refrigerator.  It is a battery-free solar refrigerator that connects directly to a solar panel without other controls or batteries.  This solar refrigerator will maintain temperatures safe for refrigerated perishables for four to five days of cloudy weather without the need for a battery.  It contains a built-in ice bank that freezes when the sun shines. It acts like a battery, but will never wear out.  It cannot be damaged by overcharging or undercharging like a normal lead acid battery.
     The cost of this refrigerator  (at $1450 plus $400 for a Solar Kit) may seem a bit pricey, but the higher initial cost replaces what you’d spend on your first battery and charge controller. After that, there is no scheduled maintenance for the life of the refrigerator other than normal cleaning.
     And if you're a Diabetic, I would venture to guess that the cost will seem insignificant if it provides you with a chance to survive.  If you know someone with this disease, please let them know about this product.  That is the first thing I thought of when I received notice of it in my Inbox.  And of course, it has great importance for the rest of us, too.  The more information we have about these kinds of products, the better we can prepare.

1 Samuel 25:6      "Say to him: ‘Long life to you! Good health to you and your household! And good health to all that is yours!"



3 comments:

  1. Can you (or have you) done a review of what is known as a zeer pot? It's made with two clay or ceramic pots, one smaller than the other. The smaller one is placed inside the larger one and the void between the pots is filled with sand that is kept dampened. Then the whole thing is covered with burlap (if a lid is unavailable). Never tried it but the resulting condensation is supposed to keep items cool to below 60 degrees from what I've read.

    Just found your site. Awesome info here. Keep 'em coming !!

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  2. I know exactly what you are talking about, and I will plan on constructing one in the next couple of weeks and post my results on the blog. Thanks for stopping by and I hope you will continue to check in and read my perspective on current events and life in America.

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  3. Thanks for the link to the frig!
    I also have read One Second After (many times) and I tell everyone I meet to read that book. It is an eye opener for those thinking about getting prepared.

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