A Woman's Perspective On The Times We Live In


October 8, 2013

It's Time To Get Serious!

     How many of you call yourself "preppers", yet have not prepared yourself thoroughly?  By that, I mean are you being wise and complete in your planning?  Have you thought this strategy out carefully and completely?
     An article on Survival Pulse, a clearinghouse of survivalist communications, has given us a very short and concise list of things to consider:
1.  Do you have a false sense of security?  You can never have enough .... enough food, enough training, enough knowledge.  Never underestimate the value of doing more in all the areas that will secure your safety.  When you think you've done it all, there's always something you haven't done well enough.
2.  Have you convinced your immediate family to get on board?  If you haven't, then you've got serious holes in your security plan.  What if you get sick, injured, or killed?  If everyone is not on board, then you have liabilities, and these loved ones can become impediments to the entire group's safety.  You can't do it all, or do it alone!  Everyone should have at least basic skills to ensure their survival, should something happen to you.
3.  Are you ignoring the "boring" prepping areas?  Everyone loves the fun areas of securing safety ... firearms training, building bug-out bags, learning new skills.  But what about those areas that are pure drudgery?  Who wants to do the heavy lifting that is required in establishing a dependable and steady water supply?  And who is willing to volunteer to learn necessary first aid skills?  Why, after all, those take time, money and lots of effort!  Make sure all the critical prepping areas are covered, so you won't experience a crisis should TEOTWAWKI occur.
4.  Do You Know How To Use Your Preps?  In one sense, I consider this an extension of #1.  Some people have bought all the things that every book and website have told them they must have, and that's as far as they went with their plan.  Somehow, having the stuff gives them a false sense of security, or at least allows them to continue with their normalcy bias.  So you must actually open the packages and boxes and try your supplies and gear.  Test your skills with new acquisitions and become an expert on all of them.
5.  Thinking your plan is perfect.  It's OK to do the research for your plan and come up with the best one you can.  But if you think there can be no improvements, or you're going to stick to your plan with no deviations, then you might want to think again.  You must develop the mindset that things can change and you must be willing and able to adapt.
6.  Telling others about your plans.  This should be a no-brainer, but you'd be surprised at those people who post everything they're doing on Facebook!  When things get ugly, your "friends" are going to get ugly.  Be very careful about who you share this information with.  Only those you absolutely trust can be taken into your confidence.
7.  Broadcasting your plans.  Play it smart!  Ordering large quantities of anything can draw unwanted attention.  Remember the "gray man" theory ... go unnoticed.  As long as your planning is within the law, it's really nobody's business what you are doing to protect your family in a crisis situation.
8.  Play It Cool.   This goes along with #7.  Don't let the appearance of your clothes, your home, or your attitude shout to the world that you are one of "those crazy preppers."  If we are ever faced with an actual crisis, you will have announced to anyone and everyone who is paying attention, that you are the first person to go see when they are desperate.  Don't raise any eyebrows!
9.  Spread it around.  Let's face it; you can have all the necessary items for survival in any situation, but if they are all located in one place, you are in a world of hurt if you have to deal with a fire or any number of natural disasters.  Do you have a plan if a flood or hurricane wipes out all your stash?  Have you thought about having a back-up plan in a different location?  Something to think about!
10.  Trying to do it all.  Think your situation through.  There's no way you can do everything you've heard about and do it all expertly and competently.  Figure out a plan that works for your family, with the resources you have, and capitalizing on your logistics and skills.  Don't get overwhelmed by the immensity of possible scenarios and trying to plan for everything.  That only leads to burnout, undue stress, and inadequacy.
     I think we can all agree that we live in a "new normal" now, so I think it's a good idea to do a periodic survey on where we are on the above topics.  Above all else, we must remain vigilant and prepared to adjust to new conditions.  With that mindset, we have the best chance of success.

Colossians 2:8   "See to it that no one takes you captive by philosophy and empty deceit, according to human tradition, according to the elemental spirits of the world, and not according to Christ."

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