A Woman's Perspective On The Times We Live In


September 27, 2012

The Importance Of Training ... In Everything!

     This past weekend I attended a two-day Handgun Training Course.  As the holder of a Concealed Handgun License, I take my responsibility seriously.  Just because I have the license in my wallet, it doesn't mean I am qualified to defend myself, or that I will react properly and safely in any given scenario.  It's all about Practice and Preparation.
     The same could be said about everything I am doing to get ready for a changing world.  Just as our handgun class reviewed all the basics of safe gun handling, and then moved into new skills that tested my stamina, my resolve and my mindset; so must I apply this same attitude to any new situation or crisis I may find myself in.
Train with a simulator to make
gun-handling safe & automatic
     For instance, I was forced to think how I would have reacted in the recent Batman theatre shooting in Colorado.  I was taught that each of us needs to formulate our own mindset on how we would respond to a home invasion, a mass shooting at the mall, a sudden attack in a parking garage.  I realized that I need to think through all these events and know how I want to respond before I am forced to make a sudden decision.  If I have to think about it then, it is too late, and my decision-making process will cost me precious time --- and quite possibly, my life.  I need to prepare my response and then practice the skills to attain the desired response.  The most important elements of this approach are that the response needs to be automatic, and the skill be flawless.
     It made me realize that I should use every situation I find myself in as an opportunity to review what my plan of defense would be.  The next time you go to the grocery store, church, sporting event, or even if you are home at night watching TV; make a point of knowing where your exits are, what you could use for a barricade, how you would defend yourself if confronted with an armed assault.  Do you have any weapons available, or are they stored in the trunk of your car, or locked in the safe ---- useless to you in your time of need.  And if it's dark, can you load and unload your weapon by feel?  If you're shot in your strong arm, can you transition to your weak arm and continue defending yourself?  If the attack comes at you swiftly and by surprise, can you draw your weapon quick enough to save your life?  The only way you can answer "Yes" to any of these scenarios is if you have practiced, practiced, practiced.
     This same mindset can be used to think how you would react if you suddenly found yourself without power or water.  Do you ever go through the steps in your mind of how you would feed your family?  Keep warm in the winter?  Supply water for drinking, washing and gardening?  Do you know how to light a fire?  Do you know how to hunt for your food?  I could name a hundred different day-to-day events that we take for granted in our spoiled modern lives.  But if you haven't at least thought about these situations, let alone know how you would respond and have the skills to adapt, then I would highly recommend that you acquire the knowledge and then practice cooking your food over a fire, planting and harvesting a garden, collecting rain water for survival.  Because, the time to actually call upon a survival mindset and employ these useful skills is not at the moment you are first faced with a crisis.  It will be too late, then.  You must automatically shift into survival mode without losing a beat; no whining, no feeling sorry for yourself.  With training and practice, the process of altering your lifestyle will be smooth and orderly.
     One other thing I learned this last weekend, is that the time to get yourself physically fit for an altered future is now.  We spent a rigorous 12-hour day on Saturday in nearly 100 degree weather.  Fighting dehydration and exhaustion along with acquiring new gun training skills took both a mental and physical toll.  That made Day Two even harder for me.  My stamina was fine, but the constant up/down and kneeling punished my knees pretty good.  So I learned another valuable lesson.
     I've got to be ready for any and all physical aspects of a new future.  It will be too late to train and get in good shape when I'm faced with a much more labor-intensive way of life.  I'd rather suffer through the aches and pains now in the comfort of a nice warm bath, with access to both a heating pad and an icepack -- both of which will not be available in a grid-down situation.
     And lastly, I will train my heart and my mind to study and know the Scriptures.  This is a skill that will sustain me throughout anything Evil can throw at us.  And it, too, must be practiced until it becomes automatic; until we can recall the particular message that our Lord spoke to us for just such a time.  It is the one skill that will never fail us, yet it is the easiest to ignore.
     I know that it's so easy to put off what we don't want to do.  None of us really want to contemplate what our minds and our souls are telling us is likely to happen.  Adapting our easy, laid-back culture to accommodate training and alternative lifestyles is costly and time-consuming.  But take it from me, as tired and sore and mentally drained as I was at the end of my weekend, I can't wait to take the class again.  The training I participated in strengthened my resolve to be prepared.  I want to be confident and ready to adapt to any life-threatening situation that comes my way.  And I know I can't accomplish that mindset by sitting on the couch and procrastinating.  I can't wish the world away and I won't be swept along with the tide of chaos and fear.  I will just keep practicing, one skill at a time.  If nothing else, I can be of help to others in their time of need, and all this training can only help me sleep better at night. That is a gift in itself.

Hebrews 12:11       "No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it."

2 comments:

  1. I've been working on learning new skills. The 1st one was learning to can. I had a wonderful garden this year so I did can a lot of fruit and veggies. I'm working on canning meat while we can still afford to buy it.
    I've also been working on getting in better physical shape. It's a slow process when you are in your sixties, but I walk a little further each day.
    The one thing I question about myself is can I take a life in self defense. When my kids were little I know without a doubt I would have done anything to protect them. Years ago while living in L.A. we had someone try to break in during the night. I was up out of bed before my husband ready to tear whoever it was apart. That mother bear instinct sure does kick in. I think the fury I felt that night even scared my husband. I hope that instinct to survive will kick in again.
    When I'm out in public I practice being aware of my surroundings. I try to be alert instead of doing things in a fog. I know that I can't out run or out fight a young attacker, so I must be smarter.
    The most important prep I do is to increase my knowledge of the Lord. Because I truly believe as goes the Christian so goes the nation.

    JM

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  2. JM, you are doing everything right! I applaud your mindset and your efforts. All that you are doing will contribute to your ability to survive our future, and you will be better able to adapt to the "new normal". And your priorities are in the right place. I agree that knowing the Lord and coming closer to him is the most important preparation we can do. I would also go a step further and say .... as goes the Christian, so goes the world! Thank you for an inspiring comment!

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